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washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the origi
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
't an impersonator, it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. ken
washington. what's the the latest on the talks or the silence? >> the silence seems to be golden, john. remember last week when all the players involved seem to be posturing and positioning and talking about negotiations? not so much, at least in the past few days. we know president obama and house speaker john boehner had a one-on-one meeting, right, on sunday, their first since mid-november. what were the details from that meeting and from the ongoing discussions? they're not really -- both sides are not really being forthcoming with what the substance of those conversations, both sides yesterday, the white house and the republican leadership put out statements. they're essentially the same. i'll read just one from boehner's press secretary. discussions with the white house are taking place but we have no detail to share about the substance of those conversations. the republican offer made last week remains the republican offer and we continue to wait for the president to identify the spending cuts he's willing to make as part of the balanced approach he promised the american people.
airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of high speed passenger rail has tried and failed to solve the problems it was intended to solve. these plans were almost always preceded by funding cuts, system i can safety and reliability problems caused a great deal of upheaval in the transportation and forced countries to renational lies a system. with that being said, we think that amtrak's long-term next general plan for the northeast corridor provides a temp plate for a public private partnership that is worth discussing. if the partnership does not reduce the public interest or the interest of the brotherhood of lock motive engineers and other skilled workers. further they be
guys in there tangoing, you have a chance to get it done. >> brianna keilar is live now from washington. we don't have a lot of details about what went on in that meeting. maybe if they're both not talking, that may be a good thing. >> that's right. in fact, we have almost absolutely no details. the things that really interesting, though, to observers here is the statement that came out from the white house and from the speaker's office. they're the same statement verbatim. they're not leaking details. and that's something that you may see as possibly a good thing. it's certainly not a bad thing. it means they're coordinating and trying to negotiate or speak with good faith here. so this is, as you mentioned, the first time that the two have met in the last 23 days. this is the first time that john boehner and president obama have met one-on-one since election day just to give you a sense. again, to stress no word on progress that they're really get being anywhe -- getting anywhere here. house republicans don't want to cave on the white house's demand, the tax income race, the income ta
companies and some countries. >> do you plan to stay in washington? >> it depends on what kind of business i can acquire. i have a beautiful wife and i want to spend more time with him and get my golf handicap down to single digits. >> have you thought about the preservation of your papers? what will you do with all that? >> i am sending most of it to indiana university. especially the autism information. i have -- the indiana historical society will get some of my papers. i hope they find a good use for them. >> when you look back over 31 years which went by very quickly, what were the best years? >> oh, gosh, there was good in all of them. the best years from my standpoint was when i was chairman. even the people who work for me said, we felt like we were accomplishing something. we were fighting the good fight. that is one of the things i hold most dear. we were able to put on the gloves, grabbed the sword, and fight for the things we thought was right. >> thank you for spending time with this reflecting back on your ears in washington. -- years in washington. >> we are asking business ow
'll be available for talks, adding ohio has both cell phone service and airports. darren gersh, nbr, washington >> susie: that stalemate over the fiscal cliff weighed on the markets today, despite some encouraging reporton the economy. investors shrugged off news that initial jobless claims fell more than expected during the latest week, retail sales bounced back in november, and wholesale prices declined last month. by the close, the dow tumbled 75 points, the nasdaq fell 22 and the s&p was off nine points. despite that pessimism, many investment managers and analysts are feeling optimistic about 2013. a new investor survey says the u.s. stock market will be the best performing stock market in the world. for details, john rogers joins us. he's c.e.o. of the cfa institute that conducted the survey. so john, the u.s. stock market ranked as the best performer. if we look at the charge of coming in in second place, china and brazil. why the vote of confidence considering all these concerns about the fiscal cliff? >> you're right, susie. it's interesting. it's a happy holiday season for investors.
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
for watching "state of the union." have a safe holiday season. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choic
. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear, would you mind giving a lecture at washington university? you might ask how anybody could have been so insensitive. after 18 years in the senate, it came naturally. [laughter] george has been a close friend for nearly four decades and it is won
each other for the breakdown. abc's jonathan karl has all this from washington. all of the focus on speaker john boehner's fallback plan, what he is calling plan "b." >> reporter: that's right, george. talks have got son low, i would say this is the low point, that boehner is moving ahead with the backup plan that the president so opposes, he says he will veto. under plan "b" most of the tax cuts will be extended for those making over $1 million. for those over $1 million, the tax rates would go up. this could do nothing to address the issues. like spending cuts and the debt ceiling. democrats are calling this vote a waste of time. but, george, boehner is saying the president has a choice. support this plan or see a massive tax increase on virtually all americans after january 1st. >> yeah, they seem to think this is going to put the pressure back on the white house. but, jon, like you, i've been in touch with both sides overnight. and these talks right now are going absolutely nowhere. the chance that the country is going to go over that fiscal cliff are really rising. >> report
it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's name would be joseph p. kennedy to th
deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we're ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week. can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of count offer and we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit? >> the phone call was pleasant but was more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday were more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to was a count offer. >> the jobs record indicated unemployment is down roughly a full point from this time last year. if no deal happens -- [inaudible] . why take such a risk when the job numbers are improving. >> because increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produc
joining us from the capitol with the very latest is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international and a regular guest on the newshour. so todd, you're back with us again. six hours to go until midnight. progress reported but still to deal. >> senate republicans, judy, the latest thing that has happened is senate republicans came out of a conference meeting with their leader, with mitch mcconnell all sounding positive. they all echoed what you had in the piece there from mcconnell saying they were very, very close to sequester the automatic spending cuts remain an outstanding issue. and kind of got thrown into the mix again today. you know, the president in that appearance in the executive office building today in front of a supportive crowd, not really a press conference, more of like a minirally, talked about the sequester and his desire to have any delay in the sequester paid for with revenue increases. you know, i talked to a few house members just a few moments ago. not only ot tone of the president's presentation, but also that demand w
it was not an impersonator, it was the senate asking me to come -- the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference room. the two dog, the senator and me with a card table in the middle. and the senator, who was always on a diet, they believed that his back, he would feel better the thinner he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, you know, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was. and on a piece of bread. i add two pieces -- i had two pieces of bread and potato chips. [laughter] and we talked for three, four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book. because i'm a historian, and i'm going to find stuff. and whatever i find, i'm going put in the book. and who knows, but
discussions in washington. it could alter the tax exempt status of securities. and in corporate news, $1.1 billion to settle a u.s. class action over claims that millions of its vehicles accelerate unintentionally. the proposed settlement will compensate customers for economic losses related to possible defects in toyota vehicles. it covers most of the litigation involving unintended acceleration. so it does not cover claims for wrongful death or injuries. >> what a racket, though. >> the torque. plaintiff lawyers. $1.1 billion. >> do the math. >> that will always be -- >> and the plaintiffs get a third. is that how this works usually? >> that will always be a great business. won't it? it will always be a great business when you have someone like toyota. i don't know what happened with those. toyota tried to claim it was like use error. >> and then people said it was the mat. >> i don't know what finally came of it, but it was -- >> they never really said. >> no, but it was $1.1 billion, with a "b." >> nobody knows that it was, but you asked for it and you got it. >> yeah, yeah, yeah. an
earthquake the market will think something is going to happen in early january this is the way washington works, they walk right up to the edge of the deal, maybe even past the edge of the deal and then something happens. i still think the market believes there will be a deal, but it is a deal that might happen on january 14th. so, i don't think december 31st is a real deadline, in the mark it's mind. >> steve, tell us, what are the things that can happen that will sort of rouse the market here, move the market up or down ire way? >> well, first of all, i think the tendency for the market right now is to go higher because you have zero interest rates and zero interest rates act as a tremendous stock market flotation device. opposing investments are, you know, yielding essentially nothing at this point, so stocks become very attractive. but i still think the big story and the stories that most traders will be watching is the fiscal cliff so that's story number one. an interesting thing happened yesterday and that's the price of oil traded to an all-time high going back to october, not an a
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
in putting china's legal system on the political map in washington. when i started long ago to study about china's legal system, most people who would charitable felt sorry for me. they felt i must be having a nervous breakdown -- [laughter] to throw away a career in the law on a country we could not visit and seven years after the korean war's ended, we had bad relations. american views about "red china" were very negative. i wanted to have the help of the scientific you see in analyzing the rule of law in china. i remember 1964 or 1965 in lake tahoe and comparing the soviet and chinese legal systems. i was asked to talk about law. i talked about law, courts, judges. the political scientists could not have been less interested. i was disappointed. the next day talking with the conference organizers, i made another attempt. i never mentioned law. i talked about institutions and sanctions and use all the jargon of political science. they all said, that is really fundamental. [laughter] i discovered a little bit about how to be persuasive in the world.al million -- as cheng li's recognizes i
time. you can listen to c-span radio in the washington/baltimore area at 90.1 area, on xm channel 119 or online at c-span radio.org. >> supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg spoke in the fall at the university of colorado law school. she talked about gender discrimination cases and her own experiences as a woman law school graduate in the early 1960s. this conversation is about an hour, 15 minutes. .. >> we are so grateful to have you here, phil, for all your work. [applause] >> we have several regions here, two of whom are grads of our fine law school, michael and jodi your and irene is here also i believe. and any other regions are here, we thank you for all your support and your spirit. we do very much believe in engaging with the community come and we want to continue to do so in so many ways. i would echo what melissa hart said, and very importantly acknowledge the leadership in terms of the energy she brought to the white center, this lecture was her brainchild. the constitution of the activities were brainchild, and recognizing that under the board of regents, the chase
for him to return to washington. >> reporter: definitely. we expect that he will be heading back to washington, d.c. he was supposed to be here through the new year. i will tell you nothing is official on the schedule that he's definitely going back to d.c., but the sense you get from the white house is that it's more an issue of when and not if. if there is a bill that goes through the senate, the president will have to be there in order to perhaps twist some arms and certainly the optics are important. if we go over the fiscal cliff, suzanne, you've covered the white house. you know the president wouldn't be in hawaii while that happens. >> hopefully you can stay in hawaii, and but you knife to come back with him. we'll see. >> reporter: i think i'd be coming back. >> that's a shame. >>> it's a white christmas for some, and in some places it might be a problem. we're going to check the holiday forecast up next. >>> it's going to be a white and wild christmas in some places. this is stevens pass, washington. a stretch of highway he 2 was impassable because of heavy snow and wind
with our xaernt washington correspondents. good morning, john. were you up all night? >> not all night, but we stayed on, of course, until 9:00 after it was clear that the house alternative had collapsed. but, joe, i was listening to your conversation earlier. this is not about the far left and the far right. this is about the republican party not being able to get its act together and figuring out and strategy and pursuing a strategy. >> i watched the press conference yesterday. all the reporterses, all the mainstream media reporters were saying, mr. boehner, why are you going through this exercise? this is an exercise in futility. why are you doing this? why even hold the vote? and then he can't do it and now all of you are going, see, see, you can't even do it. >> but it does raise questions about what this means for -- >> joe, it's not about the mainstream media. it's about the inability of this republican party to face the -- face political reality. the president was re-elected. his positions are much more popular where the country than theirs. they are locked into a caucus in the
saying they're holding on until certainty comes out of the washington area. we found one company growing strong planning for a solid 10% increase in growth in the new year. joining us now in a fox business exclusive, the executive vice president at obe are. g industries. first of all, rich, 10% growth, what makes you so bullish that you're going to meet that target? >> you know we're linked to a couple very encouraging markets. one being the energy market, the medical market and the aerospace market. these markets are all looking for precision machine parts, that is something that we're very good at. we just see a strong demand. we've had a good demand in 2012 and we actually and we see more growth in 2013. david: you put a lot of money in on-the-job training. how has that paid off for you? >> we're probably the first to have a state certified apprenticeship program in pennsylvania. we currently have probably 25 guys, young people in the program. and that is helped us in down times. we have continued to invest in our people and in our equipment and that's helped us be prepared prepared f
's rooms, washington, d.c. december 24, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable mac thornberry to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the brare will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: god of light, we give you thanks for giving us another day, as this chamber lies silent, we pray for joy, hope, and love within the homes of the members of the people's house. send us your spirit so that there might be peace on earth, good will among all men and women. all that is done this day be for your great honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the share will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the chair lays before the h
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
, washington. people want to talk about these ideas. there is a huge appetite for what is war? how do we understand this? i felt this was an example vacation for me as to what the humanities can be and do. i embrace what you say. i worry about the decline in humanity concentrators even in institutions like ours. there are some places where the humanities are expendable when we have to constrained resources. i think we do ourselves a terrible disservice as a country. it does not focus on how to get where it needs to go but knows where it ought to be going. that is a fundamental obligation. >> a great ending to a great panel. thank you. [applause] i'm now going to invite al hunt to come up and introduces panel. in the last session i said gene sperling would be joining us after this discussion. he was in the midst of the fiscal cliff negotiations, so hopefully he will tell us how he is protecting these important investments. >> next, a conversation about spurring investment in the marketplace. this is hosted by the center for american progress. this is 55 minutes. >> that is a really tough
dealing with a line-up for the washington nationals. you've got a string of great players, just trying to figure out the right batting order. kerry could be secretary of state. hagel could become secretary of defense. you could see jack lew the current chief staff move over to the secretary of treasury. tom donelan move over to be chief of staff and then there's the natural opening for susan rice. she becomes national security advisor, close to the president. back in the washington mix and in a position to still help the president execute his policies. >> eliot: joe, i was with you on everything you said except the baseball metaphor. we in new york forget you have a baseball team in washington. a moment transitory time to have a team that can play above .500. did john mccain know about this before it was announced publicly? did white house call him and say okay john, you win this one but we want something back. we're going to give this to you. be gracious but here's what we expect in terms of a b or c? what do you thin
was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when did you finish this? guest: early this year? host: early 2012? guest: yes. and about six months of copy editing and final editing with bill phillips. host: out of all the characters in it besides winston chump if you were -- churchill if you were going it write another book who would it be? guest: admiral king comes to mind. and a nod to my dad who was a navy guy. fascinating character. host: will you write another book? guest: y
was african-american as well. i found belle's birth certificate, actually, in washington. she was born in washington, and it tells her birth date and lists 'c' for colored. and the family lived in washington for some years. greener was dean at the howard university law school. he was a very distinguished lawyer and scholar, an active republican. the republicans rewarded him for his service, recruiting blacks for the party, by making him the secretary of the grant monument in new--ulysses s. grant monument in new york, and he was appointed us consul in vladivostok by mckinley and roosevelt. but at some point, around that time, in the late 1890s, the family split up and they were--he was the darkest. the mother was very light-skinned and the children were very light-skinned. so they dropped the r off the end of their name and the mother said her name was genevieve i. greene, widow, although mr. greener was very much alive. and they brought--invented the name da costa, i think, to explain their exotic looks. and belle passed as white for the rest of her life, as far as i know. i don't thi
in washington and how the fiscal cliff is likely to effect investment decisions. we have value investor leon cooperman, he's going to join us on set starting at 7:00 eastern time. then at 8:00 eastern, we have black op co-founder and ceo ralph schlosstein. and lynn hutchins will join us. we'll talk about what they see playing out and what they think is working when it comes to the markets now. >> the bill that the president says is in the house that he will sign if -- that's in the senate -- >> the senate. >> the senate that he will sign if the house passes it is what? >> that is $. >> -- that is 250? >> 250? >> he said 400. he said, i have the pen, let's keep tax rates where they are for everyone at 250 and below. so this one, that's c these guys are pretty clever because that would keep rates where they are for everyone at a million and below. no middle-class taxpayers up to a million dollars -- >> that's no matter what, isn't it, in either bill? >>yon r -- i think it would be the same in either one. that's not -- what reid and i guess pelosi, you saw that, said she opposes the million-dol
. kennedy, then bradley and his wife called tony. brad day, washington and your chief brought his reporter who later became an jim cannon who served president ford. they decided to make a tape not his decision but the kind of person that he is. we will talk about it after you listen. >> when was the moment you were absolutely ? >> to get the support it is just long long long. why? >> host: one thing that has been said about president kennedy he could be dispassionately analytical to talk about himself. right as a presidential campaign is beginning like he is the third party. >> what struck me about the dinner party conversation was how much he enjoyed politics. his passion. this is true with the tapes of the oval office. the delight of political life comes through very powerful and his conception was absolutely right. of the 19th century presidents did not do much with the tariff, slavery issue, but by the time of the presidency it was seen as a vaster institution of political life. >> host: feel free. >> i love said dinner party tape it was just given to the library five years ago. we're
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